Epic West Coast Road Trip, Part 2


“The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page.” – Saint Augustine

CABRILLO NATIONAL PARK, Photo by Deb Schell

Travel calls for adventure and a road trip isn’t complete without an unplanned stop, which is why when I found out that Cabrillo National Park was only 30 minutes away from where I was staying in La Jolla Cove, I decided to check it out. Views of San Diego and even far off in the distance the Mexican border could be seen.

Check out the previous post to read about my first day in California here.

When I arrived, the first thing I did was try to check out the visitor center, but it was closed due to the pandemic. My boyfriend, Zeus, who I’m traveling with mentioned to take a quick walk around to get some photos of the amazing views. He’s a photographer as well and so we’d been challenging each other about finding the most interesting points of view on the trip. Looking out into the ocean and over towards downtown San Diego, it looked so small, and the ocean seemed so massive.

VIEW OF SAN DIEGO FROM CABRILLO NATIONAL PARK, Photo by Deb Schell

History of Cabrillo National Monument

Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo led the first European expedition that explored what is now the west coast of the United States. Cabrillo departed from the port of Navidad, Mexico on June 27, 1542. Three months later he arrived at “a very good enclosed port,” which is known today as San Diego Bay. Historians believe he anchored his flagship, the San Salvador, on Point Loma’s east shore near the land that becomes Cabrillo National Monument. Cabrillo later died during the expedition, but his crew continued on, possibly as far north as Oregon, before thrashing winter storms forced them back to Mexico.

CABRILLO NATIONAL MONUMENT AND PARK, Photo by Deb Schell

Cabrillo National Monument, established in 1913, remembers Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo’s voyage of exploration. It was the first contact between the coastal California Indigenous tribes, like the Kumeyaay, and men from Europe. Though the San Salvador stayed only six days in San Diego harbor, this journey and future Spanish journeys to the area would shape southern California’s complex history. (via NPS)

CABRILLO NATIONAL PARK, Photo by Deb Schell

The rocky intertidal area, also known as the tidepools, is a favorite spot at Cabrillo National Monument. Each year over 200,000 people visit the tidepools, one of the best protected rocky intertidal areas in California. The best time to visit the tidepools is during the fall and winter months, when we get our great low tides during park hours. During spring and summer, the tide is usually covering the tidepools when the park is open. (via NPS)

Check out more photos from my trip here. I missed photographing the historic lighthouse, but if you get a chance, check it out!

Virtual Exhibit: The 19th Amendment Centennial

August 26, 2020 marked exactly 100 years since the 19th Amendment became law, ensuring that gender could not exclude women from voting in the United States. To celebrate, the Old Point Loma Lighthouse was lit in purple and gold, and the park hosted an outdoor exhibit about the suffrage movement. The celebration continues online! The exhibit along with text and audio transcripts for accessibility are available below. More information about the 19th Amendment is available at nps.gov/womenshistory.

Continue following our journey with Part 3

2 Comments Add yours

  1. Sounds like a great adventure

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